Tycho crater – central peak

tychoCentralPeaks_lro

Credit: NASA

Staying on the crater theme for a bit, the image above is of the central peaks of the prominent crater Tycho on the Moon.

The mountainous formation above is some 15km across and rises 2km from the base of the crater which was formed relatively recently some 100 million years ago.

The central peak forms directly following impact and is due to a phenomena known as uplift which occurs in the larger craters and is due to complex interactions between shock waves, the force of impact and the inherent strength of the impacted area as well as gravity.

This image was obtained at lunar sun rise on 10th June 2011 by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and shows the central peak casting a long shadow and captures amazing detail at incredible resolution.

Zooming in a little closer, individual boulders can be picked out on the peak, the largest in the image below is 120m in size, the overall image is 1200m across approximately:

Tycho boulder

Credit: NASA

The Tyco crater is a prominent impact crater located on the southern highlands and is named after the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe.  The crater has an extensive ejecta that radiates out in a spoke formation some 1500km or so from the central crater.

An image of the Tyco crater in its full glory from the LPO and another as seen from London are shown below:

Tycho

Credit: NASA

tyco 10.09